Technically, neither space nor objects in space move. The observable universe. The observable universe is a somewhat different story. The expansion of the universe is the increase in distance between any two given gravitationally unbound parts of the observable universe with time. One famous analogy to explain the expanding universe is imagining the universe like a loaf of raisin bread dough. $\begingroup$ Ben, the sticking point (just personally for me) is referring to an observable universe.

The Universe is Expanding One of the interesting things about the universe is that it is currently expanding.

Well, our universe does have an edge — that is, if by "our universe," you mean the observable universe. I know the Observable Universe (OU) is Expanding, and I think this is (by now) beyond dispute. I’m not an expert, but my understanding is that the metric of space is changing for a reason that is not presently known. The universe carried on expanding and cooling, but at a fraction of the initial rate. In either case, the Universe has no edge. According to the theory of cosmic inflation, the entire universe’s size is at least 10^23 times larger than the size of the observable universe. In Big Bang cosmology, the observable universe is what, in theory, can be seen from Earth.That is light, or other signals, which has had time to reach the Earth since the beginning of the cosmological expansion. The universe carried on expanding and cooling, but at a fraction of the initial rate. We cannot know for sure what lies beyond the enclave our instruments can detect. It is an intrinsic expansion whereby the scale of space itself changes.The universe does not expand "into" anything and does not require space to exist "outside" it. There is a well written article on Wikipedia that explains it better than I can. The observable universe is the region of the universe we can observe, defined by how far light has traveled since the Big Bang 13.8 billion years ago. The part of the universe of which we have knowledge is called the observable universe, the region around Earth from which light has had time to reach us. Isn’t the expansion of the universe to be understood as an expansion of space itself, which is the reason for increased travel speed on the edges of the observable university? The universe is not expanding out from a centre into space; rather, the whole universe is expanding and it is doing so equally at all places, as far as we can tell. Many alternative explanations could explain this one observable fact; the Big Bang is …

The observable universe is around 93 billion light years across.

The short answer is that this is a nonsense question, the Universe isn't expanding into anything, it's just expanding. ... Scientists know that the universe is expanding. The part of the universe of which we have knowledge is called the observable universe, the region around Earth from which light has had time to reach us. The Incredible Expanding/Shrinking Universe.

The expanding universe is a complicated place.

During inflation the universe expanded faster than light, but that's something that actually happens all the time, it's happening right now.

The Universe may only be around 14 billion years old, but the observable Universe is around 93 billion light-years across (so we can see ~46.5bn light-years in each direction). The speed of light is just that — a speed — and the universe …

Perhaps the Universe as a Whole (UAW) is not expanding at all. The definition of the Universe is that it contains everything. However, there is no evidence at all to show that every part of the Universe is expanding. But that still sets a limit on the size of the universe humans can see, called the observable universe. Either the Universe is infinite, going on forever, or its finite, with a limited volume. But this does not mean that Earth is the center of the universe. The primary evidence for the expanding universe concept is the redshift of light from distant galaxies, which increases with distance of the galaxy from Earth. Here's how we know the Universe isn't expanding differently in different directions. The Hubble law implies that distances are increasing between

T he Observable Universe is roughly 90-Billion Light Years in diameter, and estimated to be 13.5-Billion years old, because it … It's growing larger and larger all the time. This relationship is demonstrated by the Hubble constant, which estimates that space is expanding at approximately 70 km/s/Mpc. Not only is it growing larger, but the edge of the universe is expanding at a faster and faster rate. actual universe is bounded by the edge of the observable universe. One famous analogy to explain the expanding universe is imagining the universe like a loaf of raisin bread dough. In 1929 Edwin Hubble announced that he had measured the speed of galaxies at different distances from us, and had discovered that the farther they were, the faster they were receding.