The Malayan tapir is a grazer and a browser. The animal has a distinctive black and white pattern on its body.

The scientific name refers to the East Indies, the species' natural habitat. [3] The scientific name refers to the East Indies, the species' natural habitat. The body is black or dark grey except for a white area on the back and sides of the tapir. The coloring of the Malayan tapir is highly recognizable. The animal is also known as the Asian tapir. The front of the body and hind legs are black while the back has a saddle-blanket of white. The Malayan Tapir (Tapirus indicus), also called the Asian Tapir, is the largest of the five species of tapir and the only one native to Asia. Scientific classification; Kinrick: Animalia: Phylum: Chordata: Cless: Mammalia: Order: Perissodactyla: Faimily: Tapiridae: Genus: Tapirus: Species: T. indicus: Binomial name; Tapirus indicus (Desmarest, 1819 ) Malayan tapir range Synonyms; Acrocodia indica. Body Length 6-8 feet ; Height 3-3.5 feet ; Tail Length 2-4 inches ; Weight 550-704 lbs. The scientific name refers to the East Indies, the species' natural habitat. Diet. Malayan tapirs are about 1.8 to 2.4 metres (6-8 ft) in length and they stand 90 to 107 cms (3-3.5 ft) tall, they weigh on average 250 to 320 kgs (550-700 pounds) with the females usually being larger than the males. Common Name Asian/Malayan Tapir ; Scientific Name Tapirus indicus; 4. Like all tapirs, it is in danger of extinction. In general, tapirs are dense and bulky with hard, tough skin. The Malayan tapir (Tapirus indicus), also called the Asian tapir, Asiatic tapir, Oriental tapir, Indian tapir, or piebald tapir, is the largest of the four widely-recognized species of tapir and the only one native to Asia. The Malayan tapir (Tapirus indicus), also called the Asian tapir, is the largest of the four species of tapir and the only one native to Asia. The Malayan Tapir was once found throughout the tropical lowland rainforests of Southeast Asia, including Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar (Burma), Thailand, and Vietnam.

Due to human activity, especially deforestation for agricultural purposes as well as poaching and illegal trade, its habitat and numbers have decreased in recent years.

In the Malay language, the tapir is commonly referred to as cipan, tenuk or badak tampong. In the Malay, the tapir is commonly referred to as "cipan", "tenuk" or "badak tampong". Its scientific name is Tapirus indicus. Appearance. The Malayan tapir is the largest species of tapir and has the longest probiscis. Common name: Malayan Tapir Scientific name: Tapirus indicus Distribution: Indonesia, Malaysia, Myanmar, Thailand Conservation status (IUCN): Vulnerable